Highlight on Begonias

Highlight on Begonias

  If you’ve ever wondered what single genus of plant we carry the most of here at the greenhouse is, it’s unequivocally begonias. In fact, we carry a minimum of seven different types of begonias! But what are their uses? Where will they grow? If you’re new to gardening or just need a bit of a begonia-refresher, I’m here to clarify things. Non-Stop vs. Solenia Begonias These two confuse people often. At first (or second, or third) glance they look very much the same. But, plant a Non-Stop where a Solenia should be, and it’s sure to end in disappointment.  Non-Stop begonias are best for bringing bountiful colour to your shade beds, and Solenia are top performers for sun. To remember the difference, think of the French word for sun – soleil – solenia! To tell them apart, look at the foliage – Solenia’s leaves are rounder, and a deeper, glossier green than Non-Stop. Non-Stop Best suited for: Full shade to part shade Form: Mounding Colours: Yellow, orange, red, white, pink Solenia Best suited for: Full sun Form: Mounding Colours: Pinks, reds, orange, peach, yellow   Rieger A somewhat-new introduction at Southview, these beauties have smaller flowers, but are prolific bloomers and come in lovely colours. Also called Elatior begonias. Great for pots or in the garden. Best suited for: Part sun to sun Form: Mounding Colours: Pinks, reds, orange, peach, yellow, white   Pegasus Grown for its tropical, silvery-green foliage, making it a gorgeous, eye-catching choice for planters. Bonus: adaptable as a houseplant. Best suited for: Part shade to shade, but will handle full sun with sufficient moisture...

Creating Pollinator-Friendly Gardens

Looking to attract more bees, butterflies, and birds to your yard? Here are a few tips for creating a pollinator-positive space: Keep in mind that you don’t want to limit the pollinator-attracting blooms to just the height of summer – think about spring through late fall. Make sure to include lots of native varieties. Often times ‘new and improved’ varieties are bred for certain attributes like colour, height, and form, and tend to be sterile. Amp up the biodiversity in your yard – bees especially like a wide range of plants to gather nectar and pollen from. Think about their shelter as well – some bees nest in rotted logs or in the ground, so if you have an area you can allow to get a bit wild, let it go! Consider purchasing a bee house, or click here to learn how to build you own! Think about adding white clover to your lawn – it’s tough, easy-growing, and wonderful for bees. We carry it in bulk at Southview, and we consistently hear only positive things about it as a grass substitute. Provide water sources as well. Birdbaths are great for birds, but consider adding shallow plates of water around for bees to drink from. Add a few rocks on the plate as a landing pad. Encourage other people in your neighbourhood to add vistas of pollinator-attracting plants!   Pollinator-Attracting Perennials Milkweed (Asclepsis) Echinacea Geranium Sedum Bee balm (Monarda) Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia) Hollyhock (Alcea) Allium Russian Sage (Perovskia) Obedient Plant (Physostegia) Perennial Sage (Salvia) Aster Coreopsis Delphinium Hosta Phlox Crocus Herbs like thyme, oregano, mint and lavender Catmint (Nepeta)...
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